Tag Archive: lucid


I have had this basic idea for a while, but never actually put it into action. I had an experience in lucid dreaming today that showed me that this would nearly definitely work as I planned, particularly if I put effort into it, so I think I have decided to really do it. What showed me is that I actually went 6 hours after waking up to taking a nap, and this easier slipping into the lucid state that occurs after getting some sleep, which I will mention shortly, still occurred, which combined with past experiences shows me that my mind, whether or not it is like this to this degree with other people, is able to maintain this state where it is receptive to the lucid dreaming state for an extended period of time. The idea is that I will sleep multiple, perhaps 3 as a baseline, times per day, in shorter intervals, as opposed to one long block of sleep each night. The main purpose behind the experiment is this. When you sleep some, then wake up, then go back to sleep, your odds of lucid dreaming skyrocket. I’m basically at a point where I can lucid dream whenever I want in that situation, if I have the intention. Given this sleep schedule, then, I could be in a state of perpetual lucid dreaming. Every time I sleep, I could lucid dream.

Expanding on this benefit, I actually developed a technique a while back where I could consciously enter a dream, meaning lay down to go to sleep and maintain awareness until I was in a dream, and then proceed with my lucid dream. This technique is largely dependent on having gotten some sleep prior to attempting it. If I stick to this sleep schedule, and resume working on my technique, I could actually consciously enter a lucid dream every single time I sleep. This means that I would never actually lose consciousness, if I so chose. As I continued to dream like this, my awareness of my dreams would continuously improve, and my ‘dream time’ would continue to expand. Each moment of dreaming is far larger than the corresponding perception of time in our waking lives. Typically we only remember very little of our dreaming, and we falsely correspond this dream time to waking time, and think we dreamt for that long. In actuality, we are remembering a tiny fraction of our dreams. This means that, if successful, I could potentially lucid dream for incredible amounts of ‘time,’ and continuously improve my abilities at making that experience go how I want.

There are a couple further benefits, one seems clear to me, and one is somewhat theoretical and vague. The clear one is that through having this continual experience of lucid dreaming, I would be able to increase a sense of ‘detached joy’ in my waking life, making me more free and joyous. It would also continuously improve my sense of seeing reality as being essentially no different than dreaming, which is a somewhat long-standing ‘belief’ of mine that grows the more I lucid dream. If my theories in this regard are correct, this change in perception could lead to a continuous improvement to my level of ‘control’ over reality. There is also a theoretical benefit, not necessarily tested scientifically yet but that makes sense, and as a side note I believe Leonardo Da Vinci may be testament to. Perhaps the main benefit of sleeping is dreaming. We cannot go without dreaming, or we go insane. Despite this, we only dream perhaps half of the time we sleep. With my sleep schedule, I would dream the entire time I slept. This would be at least doubling the amount of dreams I have. Theoretically, it makes sense that this could result in some unforeseeable raising in the abilities of my consciousness. If not dreaming makes you crazy, more dreaming probably raises your levels of consciousness. Beyond this, my dreams would be lucid, which I imagine has even more benefits for your consciousness.

Wow, I officially got published! “Journal of Epistemology” published a poem, an essay, and a picture of mine. She also wrote a paragraph towards the beginning of the Journal saying good things about me and my work. She particularly talked about my essay “Dreamer,” which she at the end compared its potential to John Lennon’s song “Imagine.”
She said she would like me to submit more work for upcoming editions! AWESOME! 😀
http://paradispublications.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderfiles/joejournalofepistemologyvol1iss2.pdf

Just a little bit ago, I was laying in bed watching Pineapple Express. I decided to turn over, while it was on, and close my eyes, with the possibility of falling asleep to take a nap. I have this thing where sometime I can kind of see things with my eyes closed, like the images that are in my subconscious mind at the time. Anyways, I was watching these images, and they kept getting more and more vivid. Also, something happened where it seemed that my vision started having a depth. Like it wasn’t just a nothingness of having my eyes closed, but like I was looking into actual space. I started noticing more and more distinctions in the blackness, and thus the images became more like actual pictures/movies, less and less vague. While all of this was happening, I was trying to feel energy in the body, and use that energetic feeling to attempt to lose the feeling of boundaries associated with the physical body. I was having success with that too, so all of this was happening at once and it was awesome. Then all of the sudden I heard my mom say something. I was not sure if it was real or not, and I kinda thought that I had just heard it in my mind, and that it wasn’t real. I just ignored it. Then I heard my girlfriend say something(she was laying next to me in my bed in real life), and I could tell by what she said that it wasn’t real.

Shortly after that I opened my eyes. I was still laying in my bed. I looked over, and my girlfriend was asleep. I looked at the TV, and the movie I had been watching was still on. I watched a few minutes of it, and it was like real parts of the movie. Then I stood up, and began to wonder whether I was dreaming or not. I began to feel very confused, completely unsure whether I was dreaming or not. I started to walk towards the living room, and I really hoped my parents wouldn’t be out there; this was because I was feeling very uneasy and nervous, because I really had no idea if I was dreaming or not, and I did not want to interact with my parents while this was the case. I walked into the kitchen, and was leaning towards it being real. I opened the fridge, and got myself some food. Then I went to get a drink, and I decided that I should figure out for sure whether I was dreaming or not. I did the clock technique, and I found out that I was dreaming. Figuring this out overwhelmed me, realizing that something that so accurately resembled reality was actually a dream. It was really like an alternate reality, that closely resembled the “real” reality. Shortly after this, I woke up.

So yea, that was absolutely insane, and totally blew my mind in terms of knowing what is real. When I actually woke up, after a minute I did a reality check again, because I was still somewhat confused feeling, and I wanted to make sure it was real.

What is it that makes the idea of lucid dreaming so attractive? I would say the attractions include the fact that there are no consequences to your actions, and no guilt. This is aided by the fact that there aren’t, in truth, any other people, that you would have to worry about reacting negatively or thinking bad about you. The other aspect is that it is not “real.” This concept of “reality” does a lot in terms of holding us back from deriving maximum enjoyment out of life. If we want to make our actual lives more exciting, like a lucid dream, we should seek to employ, as much as we can, these same conceptions into our waking life. Feel no guilt for anything you have done, are doing, or will do. Do not think of consequences whatsoever. Remove the conception of “other people” in your reality. If there are no other people, then there is no risk of negative reaction by others; there is only your own negativity, which is easily avoided if the idea of there being other people is removed. We must also detach from our notions of reality, or what is real.

There is a great distinction between fantasy and reality; we always prefer fantasies. Our notions of reality prevent us from making these fantasies reality, and often prevent us from even enjoying our fantasies in our heads. A fantasy is perfect; no fault can be found in a fantasy. Problems only arise when the fantasy is contrasted with the reality. Reality should be seen as being in quotes, a term used only because it is the term commonly used; it has no real meaning. It is an arbitrary term referring to an unreal and arbitrary concept. Fantasy need not be put in quotations; a fantasy is perfect. The only flaw one could find in a “fantasy” is that it is opposed to reality. Remove this distinction by removing belief in “real things,” or “the real world.” Then there is only fantasy. You still inhabit reality, but now you clearly understand that “reality” is an unreal concept, only used because it is common.

A common reaction to what I am saying is that I am speaking of selfishness, at the expense of others. This notion, at least in the way which one who has it would likely see it, is untrue. There are a few ways of explaining why this is the case. First and most simply, how “self-absorbed” you are depends on what your fantasies are. My absolute ideal reality, my perfect fantasy, includes me helping humanity as much as I can possibly imagine. Helping humanity is part of my fantasy; it is, in fact, probably the most integral part. The second aspect is this; this idea of fantasies being “selfish,” as seems to be the default reaction, is only a temporary phenomena. Whatever these selfish fantasies are you are imagining, would they hold that same tantalizing pull over you forever? Or once you indulged, would it not have such a hold on you? I believe that allowing ourselves to indulge in our fantasies is the greatest tool in removing their debilitating pull over us. This frees up vast amounts of energies to allow us to do more “useful” things, in a way that we are completely absorbed in them, and satisfied.

Also, when I say “other people don’t exist,” I merely mean that they are representations of me, and not separate. If they are me, then how can I treat them badly? It would be treating me badly. I should treat them good, and try to make them happy and joyful, correct? So if I should try to make others happy and joyful, because they are me, then doesn’t it follow that I should make myself happy and joyful too?

These(quite natural) assumptions of selfishness at the expense of others are only the result of not following this logic all the way through. I would not, indeed can not, harm others. It is senseless! They are me! I should do everything I can to make others happy. Yet I must pursue my own happiness with the same tenacity that I try to make others happy. I must forgive others for everything, past, present and future. So too I must forgive myself for everything, past, present and future. After all, am I not them?